Tag Archive: History

Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin, by Timothy Snyder.

A review of Timothy Snyder’s ‘Bloodlands’.
AUTHOR: MÅNS AHLSTEDT ÅBERG

Charlottesville, Statues, Free Speech and History

A thought-provoking evaluation of the historian’s role in contemporary debates around statue destruction.
AUTHOR: JACK HARVEY

The development of America: identity and the language of revolution

How far an American Identity had developed by 1776 is widely debated among historians. This article considers some of the facets of identity and assesses how far a uniquely American one had developed by the outbreak of the War of Independence.
AUTHOR: VICTORIA BETTNEY

Anti-Irish Sentiment in Modern Britain

This article considers the development of anti-Irish sentiment in modern Britain, using a range of evidence to show the changes and continuities in the depiction of the Irish.
AUTHOR: ENYA HOLLAND

A Million Years in a Day, by Greg Jenner (2015)

A review of A Million Years in a Day: A Curious History of Daily Life from the Stone Age to the Phone Age (2015), by Greg Jenner.

AUTHOR: VICTORIA BETTNEY

Why Has Anglo Saxon York Been Forgotten?

Usually when we think of York, we think of the Vikings. Why has York’s Anglo Saxon history been overlooked?
AUTHOR: ELSA ROBINSON

“Their Name Liveth For Evermore”: Memorialisation of the First World War in York

The meanings expressed in, and drawn from, memorials are contested by historians. What can York’s First World War memorials offer to the debate?
AUTHOR: SOPHIE TURBUTT

Propaganda during the Hundred Years’ War

The use of propaganda was integral to the Hundred Years’ War. Was Christine de Pizan involved in its production?
AUTHOR: ELSA ROBINSON

The York Historian Meets: Oleg Benesch

The York Historian meets University of York lecturer, Oleg Benesch

Reagan: a Critical Analysis

This article offers a critical exploration of the Ronald Reagan years by focusing on his economic, foreign and social policies.
AUTHOR: JAMES BASTIN

“Be the Heroine of your Life”: Five Inspirational Women From History Assessed

This article looks five women from across history from vastly different backgrounds. The background of each woman is assessed, and a judgement made on their lasting contributions to society.
AUTHOR: VICTORIA BETTNEY AND OTHERS

Erasing The Holocaust

This article explores the origins of Holocaust denial, and considers the role of the historian in overcoming it.
AUTHOR: CATHERINE METCALFE

The Life of St. Gerald of Aurillac and Secular Sanctity in the Carolingian Empire

How did Gerald of Aurillac reconcile his roles as both a secular aristocrat and a cleric? This article explores that dilemma by analysing Odo of Cluny’s ‘Vita Geraldi’.
AUTHOR: LIAM GREENACRE

Essaying the Past: How to Read, Write and Think about History, by Jim Cullen (2017)

A review of the third edition of Jim Cullen’s Essaying the Past: How to Read, Write, and Think about History.
AUTHOR: Victoria Bettney and others.

The York Historian Meets: Michael Walkden

“The university historian doesn’t have to be the only gatekeeper of the truth of the past.”
The York Historian’s Paul Kerr meets PhD student, Michael Walkden.

“High Ruler of the Storm-Tents”: The Christianization of Iceland

The Christianization of Iceland was not straightforward. It was distinctly Icelandic, as this article explores.
AUTHOR: VANIA BUSO

“And Our Enemies We’ll Scatter”: The Glorious Revolution and the Battle of the Boyne Considered

The Glorious Revolution marked one of the greatest periods of political change within early modern Britain and Ireland. This article assesses the decisive Battle of the Boyne in securing the new dynasty, as well as its lasting historical significance.
AUTHOR: VICTORIA BETTNEY

Martin McGuinness: A turbulent life

From Chief of Staff of the IRA to shaking hands with the Queen of England, Martin McGuinness embodies the changes within Northern Irish Republicanism in the late twentieth century. This article looks at key periods in McGuinness’s life, 1950-2017.
AUTHOR: VICTORIA BETTNEY

Henry Fitzroy: Bastard or Heir?

Henry VIII’s first son Henry Fitzroy has been sidelined in Tudor History. His story reveals a great deal about legitimacy, royal lineage and succession.
AUTHOR JESSICA AYRES

The Rise and Fall of Edmund Dudley: the “hawk” of Henry VII?

Should we take the negative reputation of infamous Henrician minister Edmund Dudley at face value? This article outlines his life and career in order to explore the realities of his representation.
AUTHOR: LAURA FLANNIGAN

The Fall of the Ancien Régime

The role of literacy, the rising middle class, and the decline of the Church were all factors in the Ancien Régime’s steady demise, this article shows.
AUTHOR: LAUREN MILLER

The problems with Scottish history: anglo-centrism and national identities

Scottish history is sorely neglected – British history often means anglo-centric or English history. This article charters out how Scottish history has been overlooked.
AUTHOR: EMILY DUNN

‘The Wolf of the Seas’: Thomas Cochrane, Britain’s Forgotten Hero

The British MP and admiral Thomas Cochrane has been somewhat overlooked in history. This article reconsiders his place in continental naval disputes, British history and the wider world.
AUTHOR: JATIN MAPARA

Native American Women in the European Atlantic World

This article considers the shifting dynamics of gender roles for Native American women during the cultural exchange with European colonialism.
AUTHOR: LAUREN MILLER

Shakespeare’s Life

400 years after Shakespeare’s death, this article seeks to briefly layout the life of this revered, literary genius. AUTHOR: LAUREN MILLER

Did World War Two cause the end of the British Empire?

Analysing the causes for the decolonisation of the British Empire, this article finds that World War Two was a catalyst amongst a number of other coincidental factors.
AUTHOR: CLAIRE SWEETLAND

In Defence of Empire

The British Empire often conjures some terrible national memories. This article instead explores the positive, constructive impact of the Empire.
AUTHOR: JATIN MAPARA

Margaret Thatcher and Gender

An exploration of Margaret Thatcher’s place in gender politics and feminism. Thatcher was unique as both a force for and against feminism.
AUTHOR: VICTORIA BETTNEY

Late Medieval England: A Man’s World?

Examining the lives of women in late medieval England, this article demonstrates that a patriarchal society didn’t necessarily mean that women were excluded from popular culture. AUTHOR: MARTHA BAILEY

Tudor Royal Palaces – More Than Just Hampton Court?

Hampton Court Palace is the most famous of the Tudor dynasty. However, it was but one of a repertoire of many architectural marvels. This article explores the construction and use of other grand palaces used by the Tudors.
AUTHOR: JESS AYRES

An Analysis of Slave Hierarchies in Django Unchained

To what extent are the slave hierarchies portrayed in the popular film, Django Unchained, realistic? Are representations historically accurate or merely dramatised?
AUTHOR: AILA BICER

Jinnah: Hero or Villian?

This piece questions historiographical opinions on Muhammad Ali Jinnah, founder of Pakistan, and re-assesses his role in one of the most turbulent periods in South Asian history.
AUTHOR: ANEESA YASIN

‘An heir and a spare’: a brief history of the royal succession in British history

The problem of succession to the British throne has consistently reared its head throughout history. This article explores different situations where trouble ensued regarding claims to the throne – with some more legitimate than others.
AUTHOR: LAURA FLANNIGAN

Stalin’s Cult of Personality: Its Origins and Progression

Stalin established a cult of personality that ensured a secure foundation for his autocratic regime, but how did he do it?
AUTHOR: JULIA KENNY

Eleanor of Aquitaine: Why we should not forget the medieval era when searching for our most powerful queens.

The intriguing life of Eleanor of Aquitaine, a queen to be remembered. AUTHOR: JESSICA HARRIS-EDWARDS

Mass Communication during the Great Leap Forward, 1958 – 1962

This article explores the various mediums the Chinese Communist Party used to communicate state visions and messages during the Great Leap Forward under Mao Zedong.
AUTHOR: AILA BICER

The Forgotten German History

A microcosmic study of the German town of Prichsenstadt followed by a deeper analysis into ways German history is studied today.

AUTHOR: CAITLIN BURGE

More than just a mob? The Justice System as a Motivating Factor behind the Peasants’ Revolt of 1381

An analysis of the role the justice system played in relation to the outbreak of the Peasants’ Revolt of 1381. AUTHOR: JESSICA HARRIS-EDWARDS

On This Day in 1491 – The Birth of Henry VIII

An insight into perceptions of Henry VIII and interpretations of his rule. Who was Henry VIII? AUTHOR: LAURA FLANNIGAN

The Role of Monasteries in the Carolingian Empire

An exciting piece looking at the various ways monasteries were focal institutions for society in the 9th century. AUTHOR: CAITLIN COADY

The History of an Idea: The Paradoxes of Magna Carta in its 800th Year

This weekend we celebrate the 800th anniversary of the sealing of Magna Carta — but are we celebrating an idea rather than a reality? AUTHOR: LAURA FLANNIGAN

On This Day in 1929 – The Birth of Anne Frank

A reflection on the life, diary and history of Anne Frank. This article also contains a short review of the Anne Frank Huis. AUTHOR: JULIA KENNY

Challenges to National Unity in Italy, c. 1845 – 1930

Italy faced numerous challenges to national unification in the late nineteenth century. What were they? AUTHOR: AILA BICER